Problems in US Society, 1945 - 1989

Leaving Cert > The United States and the World > Problems in US Society

These people found a way to combine their fears.
Racism was very prevalent in the US in the 1950s and 60s.
Isn't the Age of Consensus great? America is strong, its people are free, and there are no problems!

Except there were. In this section you'll examine the darker aspects of American society from 1945 to 1989 by looking at three areas: racial conflict, urban poverty and drugs and crime.

Racial conflict came to be one of the defining issues of the 1960s in the US. Civil rights marches and protests gathered steam, and Martin Luther King announced his dream to over 200,000 people in Washington that his children might some day "not be judged for the colour of their skin, but for the content of their character".

Urban poverty was an issue throughout the years we'll look at. Several presidents have had grand ideas to eliminate poverty, but how successful have they been? As we will see, this poverty lended itself to drug use and high crime rates, which had Richard Nixon campaigning against crime in 1969 and Ronald and Nancy Reagan urging young people to "Just Say No" to drugs in the 1980s.

Continue to The Collapse of Consensus, 1968 - 1989

  • Racial Conflict
    • What was life like for African-Americans before World War II? How did this change after the war? What influenced this change?
    • Desegregation: How did desegregation take place in the Army? In education? In bussing and transport? What happened with James Meredith?
    • Civil Rights Movement: What early protests were organised? What was Martin Luther King Jr.'s role? What happened in Birmingham? What happened in Washington? Why did conflict arise between African-American leaders?
    • Government Reaction: In what ways did the federal government oppose states that were practicing racial discrimination? How did life for African-Americans begin to change? How did the civil rights movement inspire other national minorities in the US?
  • Urban Poverty
    • What were the main causes of urban poverty? How did ghettos form? How did housing and tax policies affect poor people?
    • How was President Johnson's Great Society programme meant to help people in poverty? What actions did he take in his war on poverty? What were the results?
    • Why did the Watts Riots take place? Why did riots spread? What was their impact?
  • Drugs and Crime
    • Why did crime levels rise in cities after World War II?
    • How did drugs come to be involved in urban crime? How did this link develop by the 1980s?
    • What concerns did American people have about these issues? How did the US government respond?

Case Study: 
The Montgomery Bus Boycott, 1955-6

Key Personalities: 
Martin Luther King

Key Concepts:  
Discrimination
Mass Media
Liberalism

A fire rages behind a police car in the midst of the Watts Riots in 1965.
 
Higher Level (100 marks each)
2015: Why did the Montgomery bus boycott (1956) take place, how was it carried out, and to what extent was it successful?

2014: Why did race relations remain a major issue in the US, 1945-1989?

2012: What was the significance of one or more of the following in US history: Hollywood 1945-1968; the Montgomery Bus Boycott; religion in modern American culture.

2011: What was the contribution of Martin Luther King to US affairs?

2007: In what ways did the Montgomery bus boycott, 1956, advance the cause of the civil rights movement?

2006: During the period, 1945-1989, what was the impact of one or more of the following on American society: racial conflict, urban poverty, organised crime?

Ordinary Level:
2016, The United States and the World, Part C:
How was the 1956 Montgomery bus boycott carried out and how successful was it? (40)

2015, The United States and the World, Part C:
What leadership did Martin Luther King offer the Civil Rights movement? (40)

2014, The United States and the World, Part B
2007, The United States and the World, Part B:
Write a short paragraph on urban poverty, drugs and crime. (30)

2014, The United States and the World, Part C
2010, The United States and the World, Part C:
What did the Montgomery bus boycott (1956) contribute to the Civil Rights movement? (40)

2012, The United States and the World, Part B:
Write a short paragraph on urban poverty, drugs and violence. (30)

2006, The United States and the World, Part C:
Why was the Montgomery bus boycott (1956) so important to the story of the civil rights movement? (40)

First Lady Nancy Reagan promotes her husband's administration's War on Drugs in the 1980s.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Comment